Salon Without Boundaries - First live event - Wednesday 14th November 2018 - 1901 Arts Club, London

Salon Without Boundaries is an initiative set up by a pair of old friends: Dr Briony Cox-Williams, pianist, researcher and postgraduate tutor at the Royal Academy of Music, and Pierrette Thomet, mezzo, artist and founder/director of WAM-Weather Art and Music. We want to look back on the thriving and culturally extremely important phenomenon of the 19th-century salon, which gave women a platform to contribute the fruits of their creativity to a culture that denied them a public voice. And we want to re-imagine the salon for our digital times by using the opportunities offered by online platforms and streaming to reach across the globe to women creators. We are particularly interested in reaching across disciplines, so our very first live salon is called 'Mapping the Boundaries - Women, Creativity and the Natural World', and it's taking place in London at the 1901ArtsClub near Waterloo station, on 14th November. We'll have a talk about Maria Merian, 17th-century artist, entomologist and explorer, music by Fanny Hensel (our Salon patron) and Pauline v. Decker, poetry by Elizabeth Lewis Williams reflecting on scientific engagement with Antarctica, and settings of Elizabeth's poetry by Jenni Pinnock. Plus discussion and of course, in true Salon fashion, food and drink.

Doors open at 6pm, and we start at 7pm. Join us for all of it or a bit of it. Tickets are available at http://www.1901artsclub.com/ and include food and a drink of your choice.

We are delighted to be able to acknowledge the generous support of the Royal Academy of Music and the Arts Council, enabling us to go ahead and make our dream a reality. Now all we need is an audience to come and enjoy themselves. Having bent many conference attendees' ears about this and got so much encouragement from you all, we would love to be able to welcome you to the very first Salon Without Boundaries! Please also feel free to share this through your networks. The more the merrier and the better the conversation.

http://www.1901artsclub.com/14-nov-2018-mapping-boundaries---women-creativity-and-the-natural-world8203.html

https://www.salonwithoutboundaries.com/  

@SalonRebooted


New call for music festivals to play more works by female composers

This is what I have been talking about today at the sound Festival in Aberdeen, which is featuring 50 women composers. It was a powerful moment and there was a very constructive discussion with our audience. Many thanks to Sound Scotland for providing me with the opportunity to raise these issues.

https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/17010567.new-call-for-music-festivals-to-play-more-works-by-female-composers/

Lucy Hollingworth

Women in Music AGM

The AGM of Women in Music will be held on 26th November, near to Waterloo Station, London.  Please note that the AGM will be on the second floor of the building, up several flights of stairs. 
Arrival 10.45 for 11am start. 
12.30 finish. 
Coffee and Tea will be available. 
Please RSVP to [email protected] putting Women in Music AGM in the Subject line. 

Nominations for Trustee posts need to be received by 12th November 2018.

Sarah

20th Anniversary London Improvisers Orchestra

The London Improvisers Orchestra will be celebrating their twentieth anniversary at Cafe Oto, London, 1, 2 and 3 December, with a group bringing back some of the local and international musical greats who have played with the orchestra over these 20 years, such as Susan Alcorn, Hyelim Kim, Julie Kjaer, Louis Moholo, Maggie Nicols, Annie Whitehead and Jason Yarde.

Twentieth Anniversary London Improvisers Orchestra is supported using public funds by Arts Council England, and by PRS Foundation's Open Fund for Organisations and the Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia,

London Improvisers Orchestra
http://www.londonimprovisersorchestra.co.uk/20thAnniversary.html

Congratulations to ARQ on winning the Parliamentary Jazz Awards.

'On Tuesday night at the Pizza Express Live, ARQ were announced as the winners of the Jazz Ensemble of the Year at the Parliamentary Jazz Awards 2018. Given that the other shortlisted bands were Dinosaur, Ezra Collective and Beats & Pieces Big band, all wonderful groups, we were in total shock. Alison was actually the bassist in the house band for the event and was playing the walk-up music for the winner when she realised she had won. She had to finish playing the piece, put down her bass and then walk up to collect the award…'
Alison Rayner is also nominated for Bass Player of the Year.
More info here Blow The Fuse · Jazz Music

Lambeth Wind Orchestra

A message from John Holland
I have been working with Lambeth Wind Orchestra on a unique programme called ‘Breaking the Sound Barrier’, helping to broaden the appeal of music by women via the medium of the wind orchestra, one of the most accessible varieties of community ensemble. Several pieces have not been performed in the UK before, so we are proud to be presenting the UK premieres of ‘The Duxbury Fanfare’ (1997) by Dr Lauren Bernofsky (USA) and ‘Me Disagrees’ (2013) by Catherine Likhuta (Australia), along with fresh, bespoke transcriptions of historical orchestral repertoire by Louise Farrenc (‘Second Overture’, 1834), Dame Ethel Smyth (‘The Wreckers’ (Overture), 1906) and Lili Boulanger’s ‘D’un matin de printemps’ (1918) in the centenary year of her death.

 

The band is celebrating its tenth anniversary this year; back in 2010, it gave the premiere of its first commission by a female composer, Elizabeth Winters (winner of a British Composer Award, 2009) – we are giving a repeat performance as part of this concert (‘Playing With Destiny’) and she will be joining us, which we are very excited about. (The band also commissioned a piece from Lucy Pankhurst, which we premiered in 2016). The concert has also received support from the Ambache Charitable Trust, which you will hopefully be aware of, in pursuit of our goal in reaching the widest audience we can in appreciation of historical women composers.

 

You can find out more about the concert here: https://www.facebook.com/events/964106457097247/ and, for the first time, we are holding a pre-concert talk from 6.30pm, which is free to attend with a concert ticket; this will explore the historical and social contexts behind the music and allow an open discussion about women composers from across the centuries.

Women in Jazz: A Celebration of the Past, Present and Future - A Barbican Library Exhibition

A musical and social survey of the rich contribution women have made to jazz over the last 100 years, and of the talented upcoming generation who herald an exciting new era.

The exhibition pays particular attention to instrumentalists. While many vocalists such as Ella, Billie, Nina and Cleo are household names, many star players and pioneers have been sadly neglected and deserve to be rediscovered. The exhibition also highlights how 20th century social and political change has played a significant role in women’s growing involvement in jazz. 

Drawing on the rich resources of the National Jazz Archive the exhibition includes photos, posters, journals, video and memorabilia.

https://www.barbican.org.uk/whats-on/2018/event/women-in-jazz-a-celebration-of-the-past-present-and-future


Are you a record label, venue, club, artist or other music organisation? Meet HLF and ACE, Tuesday 23rd October, London

Are you a record label, venue, club, artist or other music organisation with a story to tell, a legacy to preserve, or a catalogue that needs re-igniting? Do you have audiences to build?

Come meet funders Arts Council England and Heritage Lottery Fund on Tuesday 23rd October at Rich Mix, 35-47 Bethnal Green Road, E1 6LA for a night of information, inspiration and motivation that will help you decide whether we are the right funders for you!

The evening includes an opportunity to pitch your idea to our panel for the chance of a prize up to £500!

Doors open at 18:30 for a 19:00 start.  Ends: 21:00

To book a place, email [email protected] with your:

Name:

Organisation:

Contact email:

Note: This event will not be relevant for individual musicians or artists seeking grants for their creative work.  Please see Arts Council England National Lottery Project Grants for alternative funding options.

 


Ethel Smyth at Southwark Cathedral - London Oriana Choir - 3 November 2018

LONDON ORIANA CHOIR OPENS 2018/2019 SEASON AT SOUTHWARK CATHEDRAL WITH BACH AND LEADING SUFFRAGETTE COMPOSER ETHEL SMYTH

·       Concert at Southwark Cathedral on Saturday 3rd, November

·       Pre-concert talk by Dr Christopher Wiley from the University of Surrey on the extraordinary life of Dame Ethel Smyth

·       Continues the choir’s commitment to championing the work of women composers under its five15 initiative

 

For its first concert of the 2018/19 season, the London Oriana Choir is pairing two major choral works written more than a hundred and fifty years apart under compellingly different circumstances, the Magnificat by J S Bach and Mass in D by Ethel Smyth.

First performed in Leipzig in 1733, the Magnificat in D is one of Bach's most popular vocal works, written when the composer was Kantor at the Thomasshule in the city. On the other hand, Ethel Smyth had to contend with opposition from her father to pursue a career in music, ultimately becoming a prolific composer, writing chamber music, choral works and opera, as well as orchestral, piano and vocal pieces.

Born in Kent in 1858, Ethel Smyth was a remarkable woman who lived a rich and varied life in the second half of the 19th century and the first half of the 20th. She also spent time in Leipzig, studying at the University where she met Tchaikovsky, Dvořák, and Grieg. She lived through some of the most turbulent times with regards to women’s rights and was herself a leading suffragette, giving up music for two years to devote herself to the cause. She was the first woman to have an opera performed at Covent Garden in 1902 and at the New York Met in 1903 – it was more than another 100 years before other female composers could claim this honour. In recognition of her work as a composer and writer, Smyth was made a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in 1922, becoming the first female composer to be awarded a damehood.

“By performing the rarely-heard Ethel Smyth Mass alongside the Bach Magnificat, we are continuing our commitment to bringing the work of women composers to a wider audience as part of our five15 initiative”, said Dominic Ellis-Peckham, musical director of the London Oriana Choir. “It is a beautiful and sensitive setting of the Mass text, while at the same time full of energetic writing. We are very thrilled to be giving a prominent spotlight marvellous piece and hope that our continued and passionate attention to the work of women composers results in equality for all composers, regardless of gender.”

The concert will take place at Southwark Cathedral at 7.30pm on Saturday 3rd November, together with the Meridian Sinfonia. There is also a pre-concert talk from 6.45pm to 7pm on the extraordinary life of Ethel Smyth by the renowned expert Dr Christopher Wiley from the University of Surrey. Tickets are available from www.londonoriana.com