Music intertwining women from past and present, from Asia and Europe - a concert of memory and hope, 24 January 2020

Multi-instrumentalist and composer Rachel Beckles Willson brings her quartet Beyond Mode to London, animating a unique soundworld of voice, oud, bowed tanbur and double-bass interwoven with Indian tabla. The programme combines music by a female musician at the Ottoman court in 18th-century Istanbul, Dilhayat Kalfa, and newly-written instrumental pieces, songs and extemporisations for this unique quartet.

At the heart of the programme is Beckles Willson's Sing no Sad Songs for Me, the composition that launched the ensemble, exploring the poetry of Christina Rossetti, child of Italian exiles in 19th-century London. Sing no Sad Songs for Me expresses the mysteriousness and poignancy of parting in death, while bringing together in music the spaces of Europe and Asia all too often held apart.

Beyond Mode emerged from musical encounters at Labyrinth Musical Workshops, Crete. Rachel Beckles Willson is a composer, multi-instrumentalist and researcher, Professorial Research Associate at SOAS, University of London. Her work is dedicated to seeking out and amplifying unheard voices - often those of women, often those of people on-the-move.

Evgenios Voulgaris is one of Europe’s leading multi-instrumentalists in traditional repertoires of the Mediterranean, and a leading exponent of the yayli tanbur, the bowed long-necked lute of Turkey. Ciro Montanari has emerged as one of the most significant European tabla players and is currently based in Barcelona, while Kostas Tsaroukis is increasingly in demand as oud-player and double-bassist in Greece and internationally, while working mainly Athens.

Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/soas-concert-series-beyond-mode-tickets-83698828449?fbclid=IwAR2EWn1A-Fr4Abd-ikW1HUR3ZTvZ6-fVlAcMMESzalCYhKP91tdpOONlkC0

£4 online booking required to guarantee seat allocation.

https://www.rachelbeckleswillson.com/Beyond-Mode/




And The Stats Are out! - 1 year Analysis of gender balanced classical music show The Daffodil Perspective

1 year, 42 shows, 55 hours of music. How did it go?

409 composers including 204 female composers, 155 living composers and 40 BAME composers/composers of colour.

33 hours of music by women composers, 13 hours of music by living women composers, 6.75 hours of music by BAME composers/composers of colour

584 pieces including 339 by female composers.

14 pieces per week on average including 8 by women, 3 by living composers and from May onwards every show had at least 1 piece by a BAME compose/composer of colour.

Most Played Composer: Florence Price (14 times)

Mozart was played twice, Bach twice and Beethoven once.

See the full infographic report here: 

https://daffodilperspective.files.wordpress.com/2019/11/the-daffodil-perspective-1st-year-analysis-1.pdf

Anthology of Sacred Music by Women Composers - Multitude of Voyces, Selwyn College, Cambridge, Sun 17th November 2019

Female Composer Anthology Launch - Multitude of Voyces

Selwyn College, Cambridge, CB3 9DQ
Sun 17th November 2019 5:00PM

This event marks the launch of the groundbreaking anthology of liturgical choral music by female composers spearheaded by Multitude of Voyces.  

The day comprises:
3pm rehearsal - open for observers
5pm - reception
6pm - choral evensong
7pm - drinks and dinner
8.30pm - concert

Women's Sacred Music has historically been underrepresented within the Anglican liturgy. Multitude of Voyces C.I.C. has been supporting women's sacred music compositions for several years and this anthology includes several commissions as well as selected historical works, recommended works by established composers and submissions by emerging composers. Each of the three volumes contains centuries of women's sacred music composition and each includes established historical and living composers from several countries, as well as emerging young composers.

https://www.ticketsource.co.uk/whats-on/cambridge/selwyn-college/female-composer-anthology-launch-multitude-of-voyces/2019-11-17/17:00/t-rdvjqa

Gender balanced classical radio show The Daffodil Perspective

It's the last ever Fun With Florence feature this week, wrapping up a year of celebrating the incredible music of Florence Price.

In honour of Black History Month UK there some special surprises as well.

Plus music from conductor Mei-Ann Chen, badass brass from composer Lucy Pankhurst and exciting new albums from Annabelle Berthomé-Reynolds and Gillian Smith.

https://www.mixcloud.com/TheDaffodilPerspective/the-daffodil-perspective-25th-october-2019/

Mental Health In The Music Industry: A Guide, by Rachel Jepson

Rachel Jepson's new book, Mental Health In The Music Industry: A Guide will be of interest to women working in the music industry. Rachel is a musician and counsellor with more than twenty years experience in the music industry who has presented her work to the ISM and Help Musicians UK amongst others.

Rachel says

There are many issues affecting the mental health of women in the music industry. I write about some of these issues in my new book ‘Mental Health in The Music Industry: A Guide’. To begin with, there is a major gender imbalance within the music industry in terms of senior management. According to a survey by UK Music, only 30% of senior positions in the music industry are occupied by women. Why is this? It could be a lack of encouragement, self-esteem, confidence and role models. There are a lack of role models and opportunities when it comes to certain music industry roles such as managers, tour managers, producers, mixers, sound engineers leading to some women not believing they will succeed if they pursue these careers. Women also have the added pressure of touring and working in the music industry whilst being a mother, feeling pressure from their orchestra, label, manager etc to tour whilst also feeling judged and guilty if they do so. It has been well-documented that some female artists have been abused, controlled and harassed whilst working in the music industry. There is a culture of: ‘’You’re lucky to be here and someone else will do it if you don’t.’’ For women in the industry, there is always a pressure to look beautiful and accept that they will be sexualised; this is not the same for men. Famous female musicians who live in the public eye are scrutinised, criticised and trolled if they have put on weight, had surgery, dyed their hair, worn the wrong dress leading to issues such as anxiety, depression, eating disorders and a distorted body image. I am not saying that some of the issues do not affect men, but they are a part of everyday life for most women in the music industry. Awareness must be raised of some of these issues, and support provided. I’m hoping this book, and my CPD accredited course in Mental Health Awareness In The Music Industry will address this.

Proceeds from the sale of the book will go to music charities.




Gender balanced classical music radio show The Daffodil Perspective

Join me on a trip round the world this week, going down under with music from composer of the week Peggy Glanville-Hicks and friends Paul Bowles, Arthur Benjamin and Peter Sculthorpe.

A PARMA Recordings double bill this month with music from Mira Spektor and Finnish composer Maija Hynninen.

Plus Mexican music conducted by Alondra de la Parra, African music performed by Rebeca Omordia, Cuban music performed by Rachel Barton Pine and a flute concerto by Sally Beamish.

https://www.mixcloud.com/TheDaffodilPerspective/the-daffodil-perspective-18th-october-2019/